Tag Archives: Apple

So Long, and Thanks for All the Links

 

Prismatic is shutting down its app.

I’ve been fascinated by algorithmic approaches to information overload for quite some time now. It seemed like one of those places where the Web changed everything, and now we need technology to kick in and make our lives so much easier.

Prismatic_logo,_June_2014Prismatic was one of the more promising attempts to that I’ve seen, and I’ve been a user ever since its launch back in 2012. Every time I opened it, it never failed to find me real gems, especially given the tiny setup it required when I first signed up. Prismatic included explicit feedback controls, but it seemed to excel in using my implicit feedback, which is not trivial at all for a mobile product.

flipboard-logo-iconFlipboard is likely the best alternative out there right now, and its excellent onboarding experience helped me get started quickly with a detailed list of topics to follow. With reasonable ad-powered revenue, which Prismatic seemed to shun for whatever reason, it is also less likely to shut down anytime soon. Prismatic still does a much better job than Flipboard in surfacing high-quality, long-tail, non-mainstream sources; let’s hope Flipboard continues improving to get there.

It seems, though, that news personalization is not such a strong selling point. Recently, Apple moved from a pure personalized play for its Apple News app to also add curated top stories, as its view counts disappointed publishers. In my own experience, even the supposed personalized feed was mostly made up of 3-4 mainstream sources anyway. Let’s hope that this is not where information overload is leading us back to. Democratizing news and getting a balanced and diverse range of opinions and sources is a huge social step forward, that the Web and Social Media have given us. Let’s not go backwards.

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Amazon, Apple, and Application Platforms

Apple is known for keeping a bustling legal department. Steve Jobs reportedly swore to “destroy Android“, the results of which Samsung has felt very well.

But Apple has more enemies to fight. It holds a complicated relationship with Amazon, who now produces the second most selling tablet after the iPad, claiming it already owns 22% of the US tablet market. That’s a lot of iPads that Apple isn’t selling, and so it readies its own iPad Mini in response.

A less familiar front in this battle is Apple’s “False Advertising” suit against Amazon with regard to the latter’s use of “App Store” for its Android-based application market. Amazon’s response ridiculed this claim, but this does raise the question – what exactly is Amazon’s app store all about?

Amazon’s Kindle store is one strange beast. Kindle apps are in fact re-purposed Android apps, with some added functionality. However, Amazon took care to clearly differentiate the Kindle’s UX and app store from the general Android market. So what is the justification for developing an extra Kindle app?

Every application development platform has its unique core capabilities, which developers can leverage for their own application. Developers get to apply their creative ideas on these assets, while the platform owner enjoys increased engagement for their users, with apps taking these capabilities to places the platform did not even imagine. Facebook’s application platform revolved around the social graph, a unique and very valuable data asset, and Apple provided access to the iPhone’s unique (at the time) features such as its accelerometers and gyroscope, GPS and camera.

Visiting the Amazon Kindle SDK site shows where Amazon feels it has the advantage: 1-click purchasing. This patented Amazon feature (a patent which Apple has actually licensed) can appeal to application developers who feel their application has premium features worth paying for, if only the payment was frictionless. Initial results seemed to validate that, and show excellent revenue per user on Amazon’s platform.

And so, Amazon’s platform says a lot about where Amazon feels its strength lies with the Kindle. Unlike Apple, Amazon builds its success in the tablets market on selling content, much less than selling devices. Hence, expect Kindle to continue beating the iPad on price even when iPad mini launches.