Tag Archives: IBM

Marketing the Cloud

watsonIBM made some news a couple of days ago announcing consumers can now use Watson to find the season’s best gifts. A quick browse through the app, which is actually just a wrapper around a small dedicated website, shows nothing of the ordinary – Apple Watch, Televisions, Star Wars, Headphones, Legos… not much supercomputing needed. No wonder coverage turned sour after an initial hype, so what was IBM thinking?

tensorflowRewind the buzz machines one week back. Google stunned tech media, announcing it is open sourcing its core AI framework, TensorFlow. The splashes were high: “massive potential“, “Machine Learning breakthrough“, “game changer“… but after a few days, the critics were out, Quorans talking about the library’s slowness, and even Google-fanboy researchers wondering – what exactly is TensorFlow useful for?

Nevertheless, within 3 days, Microsoft quickly announced its own open source Machine Learning toolkit, DMTK. The Register was quick to mock the move, saying “Google released some of its code last week. Redmond’s (co-incidental?) response is pretty basic: there’s a framework, and two algorithms”…

So what is the nature of all these recent PR-like moves?

marketing-cloud

There is one high-profit business shared by all of these companies: Cloud Computing. Amazon leads the pack in revenue, and uses the cash flow from cloud business to offset losses on its aggressive ecommerce pricing, but also Microsoft and Google are assumed to come next with growing cloud business. Google even goes as far as predicting cloud revenue to surpass ads revenue in five years. It is the gold rush era for the industry.

But first, companies such as Microsoft, Google and IBM will need to convince corporates to hand them their business, rather than to Amazon. Hence they have to create as much “smart” buzz for themselves, so that executives in these organization, already fatigued by the big-data buzzwords, will say: “we must work with them! look, they know their way with all this machine-learning-big-data-artifical-intelligence stuff!!”

So the next time you hear some uber-smart announcement from one of these companies that feels like too much hot air, don’t look for too much strategy; instead, just look up to the cloud.

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Microsoft Israel ReCon 2015 (or: got to start blogging more often…)

Yes, two consecutive posts on the same annual event are not a good sign to my virtual activity level… point taken.

MSILSo 2 weeks ago, Microsoft Israel held its second ReCon conference on Recommendations and Personalization, turning its fine 2014 start into a tradition worth waiting for. This time it was more condensed than last year (good move!) and just as interesting. So here are three highlights I found worth reporting about:

Uri Barash of the hosting team gave the first keynote on Cortana integration in Windows 10, talking about the challenges and principles used. Microsoft places a high empasis on the user’s trust, hence Cortana does not use any interests that are not explicitly written in Cortana’s notebook, validated by the user. If indeed correct, that’s somewhat surprising, as it limits the recommendation quality and moreover – the discovery experience for the user, picking up potential interests from the user’s activity. I’d still presume that all these implicit interests are probably used behind the scenes, to optimize the content from explicit interests.

ibm_logoIBM Haifa Research Labs have been doing work for some years now on enterprise social networks, and mining connections and knowledge from such networks. In ReCon this year, Roy Levin presented a paper to be published in SIGIR’15, titled “Islands in the Stream: A Study of Item Recommendation within an Enterprise Social Stream“. In the paper, they discuss a feature for a personalized newsfeed included in IBM’s enterprise social network “IBM Connections”, and provide some background and the personalized ranking logic for the feed items.

They then move on to describe a survey they have made among users of the product, to analyze their opinions on specific items recommended for them in their newsfeed, similar to Facebook’s newsfeed surveys. Through these surveys, the IBM researchers attempted to identify correlations between various feed item factors, such as post and author popularity, post personalization score, how surprising an item may be to a user and how likely a user is to want such serevdipity, etc. The actual findings are in the paper, but what may actually be even more interesting is the deep dissection in the paper of the internal workings of the ranking model.

Outbrain-logoAnother interesting talk was by Roy Sasson, Chief Data Scientist at Outbrain. Roy delivered a fascinating talk about learning from lack of signals. He began with an outline of general measurement pitfalls, demonstrating them on Outbrain widgets when analyzing low numbers of of clicks on recommended items. Was the widget visible to the user? where was it positioned in the page (areas of blindness)? what items were next to the analyzed item? were they clicked? and so on.

Roy then proceeded to talk about what we may actually be able to learn from lack of sharing to social networks. We all know that content that gets shared a lot on social networks is considered viral, driving a lot of discussion and engagement. But what about content that gets practically no sharing at all? and more precisely, what kind of content gets a lot of views, but no sharing? Well, if you hadn’t guessed already, that will likely be content users are very interested to see, but would not admit to it, namely provocative and adult material. So in a way, leveraging this reverse correlation helped Outbrain automatically identify porn and other sensitive material. This was then not used to filter all of this content out – after all, users do want to view it… but it was used to make sure that the recommendation strip includes only 1-2 such items so they don’t take over the widget, making it seem like this is all Outbrain has to offer. Smart use of data indeed.

Microsoft Israel ReCon 2014

Microsoft Israel R&D Center held their first Recommendations Technology conference today, ReCon. With an interesting agenda and a location that’s just across the street from my office, I could not skip this one… here are some impressions from talks I found worth mentioning.

The first keynote speaker was Joseph Sirosh, who leads the Cloud Machine Learning team at Microsoft, recently joining from Amazon. Sirosh may have aimed low, not knowing what his audience will be like, but as a keynote this was quite a disappointing talk, full of simplistic statements and buzzwords. I guess he lost me when he stated quite decisively that the big difference about putting your service on the cloud is that it means it will get better the more people use it. Yeah.

Still, there were also some interesting observations he pointed out, worth mentioning:

  • If you’re running a personalization service, benchmarking against most popular items (i.e. Top sellers for commerce) is the best non-personalized option. Might sound trivial, but when coming from an 8-year Amazon VP, that’s a good validation
  • “You get what you measure”: what you choose to measure is what you’re optimizing, make sure it’s indeed your weakest links and the parts you want to improve
  • Improvement depends on being able to run a large number of experiments, especially when you’re in a good position already (the higher you are, the lower your gains, and the more experiments you’ll need to run to keep gaining)
  • When running these large numbers of experiments, good collaboration and knowledge sharing becomes critical, so different people don’t end up running the same experiments without knowing of each other’s past results

Elad Yom-Tov from Microsoft Research described work his team did on enhancing Collaborative Filtering using browse logs. They experimented with adding user browser logs (visited urls) and search queries to the CF matrix in various ways to help bootstrapping users with little data and to better identify short-term (recent) intent for these users.

An interesting observation they reached was that using the raw search queries as matrix columns worked better than trying to generalize or categorize them, although intuitively one would expect this would reduce the sparsity of such otherwise very long-tail attributes. It seems that the potential gain in reducing sparsity is offset by the loss of specificity and granularity of the original queries.

unique

Another related talk which outlined an interesting way to augment CF was by Haggai Roitman of IBM Research. Haggai suggested the feature of “user uniqueness” –  to what extent the user follows the crowd or deliberately looks for the esoteric choices, as a valuable signal in recommendations. This uniqueness would then determine whether to serve the user with results that are primarily popularity-based (e.g. CF) or personalized (e.g. content-based), or a mix of the two.

The second keynote was by Ronny Lempel of Yahoo! Labs in Haifa. Ronny talked about multi-user devices, in particular smart TVs, and how recommendations should take into account the user that is currently in front of the device (although this information is not readily available). The heuristic his team used was that the audience usually doesn’t change in consecutive programs watched, and so using the last program as context to recommending the next program will help model that unknown audience.

Their results indeed showed a significant improvement in recommendations effectiveness when using this context. Another interesting observation was that using a random item from the history, rather than the last one, actually made the recommendations perform worse than no context at all. That’s an interesting result, as it validates the assumption that approximating the right audience is valuable, and if you make recommendations to the parent watching in the evening based on the children’s watched programs in the afternoon, you are likely to make it worse than no such context at all.

Cortana

The final presentation was by Microsoft’s Hadas Bitran, who presented and demonstrated Windows Phone’s Cortana. Microsoft go out of their way to describe Cortana as friendly and non-creepy, and yet the introductory video from Microsoft Hadas presented somehow managed to include a scary robot (from Halo, I presume), dramatic music, and Cortana saying “Now learning about you”. Yep, not creepy at all.

Hadas did present Cortana’s context-keeping session, which looks pretty cool as questions she asked related to previous questions and answers, were followed through nicely by Cortana (all in a controlled demo, of course). Interestingly, this even seemed to work too well, as after getting Cortana’s list of suggested restaurants Hadas asked Cortana to schedule a spec review, and Cortana insisted again and again to book a table at the restaurant instead… nevertheless, I can say the demo actually made the option of buying a Windows Phone pass through my mind, so it does do the job.

All in all, it was an interesting and well-organized conference, with a good mix of academia and industry, a good match to IBM’s workshops. Let’s have many more of these!

IBM IR Seminar Highlights (part 2)

The seminar’s third highlight for me (in addition to IBM’s social software and Mor’s talk), was the keynote speech by Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) veteran Professor Ben Schneiderman of UMD. Ben’s presentation was quite an experience, but not in a sophisticated Lessig way (which Dick Hardt adopted so well for identity 2.0), rather by sheer amounts of positive energy and passion streaming out of this 60-year-old.

[Warning – this post turned out longer and heavier than I thought…]

Ben Shneiderman in front of Usenet Treemap - flickr/Marc_SmithBen is one of the founding fathers of HCI, and the main part of his talk focused on how visualization tools can serve as human analysis enhancers, just like the web as a tool enhances our information.

He presented tools such as ManyEyes (IBM’s),  SpotFire (which was his own hitech exit), TreeMap (with many examples of trend and outlier spotting using it) and others. The main point was in what the human eye can do using those tools, that no predefined automated analysis can, especially in fields such as Genomics and Finance.

Then the issue moved to how to put such an approach to work in Search, which like those tools, is also a power multiplier for humans. Ben described today’s search technology as adequate mainly in “known item finding”. The more difficult tasks that can’t be answered well in today’s search, are usually for a task that is not “one-minute job”, such as:

  • Comprehensive search (e.g. Legal or Patent search)
  • Proving negation (Patent search)
  • Finding exceptions (outliers)
  • Finding bridges (connecting two subsets)

The clusters of current and suggested strategies to address such tasks are:

  • Enriching query formulation – non-textual, structured queries, results preview, limiting of result type…
  • Expanding result management – better snippets, clustering, visualization, summarization…
  • Enabling long-term effort – saving/bookmarking, annotation, notebooking/history-keeping, comparing…
  • Enhancing collaboration – sharing, publishing, commenting, blogging, feedback to search provider…

So far, pretty standard HCI ideas, but then Ben started taking this into the second part of the talk. A lot of the experimentation employed in these efforts by web players has built an entire methodology, that is quite different from established research paradigms. Controlled usability tests in the labs are no longer the tool of choice, rather A/B testing on user masses with careful choice of system changes. This is how Google/Yahoo/Live modify their ranking algorithms, how Amazon/NetFlix recommend products, how the Wikipedia collective “decides” on article content.

This is where the term “Science 2.0” pops up. Ben’s thesis is that some of society’s great challenges today have more to learn from Computer Science, rather than traditional Social Science. “On-site” and “interventionist” approaches should take over controlled laboratory approaches when dealing with large social challenges such as security, emergency, health and others. You (government? NGOs? web communities?) could make actual careful changes to how specific social systems work, in real life,  then measure the impact, and repeat.

This may indeed sound like a lot of fluff, as some think, but the collaboration and decentralization demonstrated on the web can be put to real life uses. One example on HCIL is the 911.gov project for emergency response, as emergency is a classic case when centralized systems collapse. Decentralizing the report and response circles can leverage the power of the masses also beyond the twitter journalism effect.

IBM IR Seminar Highlights (part 1)

IBM Haifa Research LabsYesterday’s seminar was also packed with some very interesting talks from a wide range of social aspects to IR and NLP.

Mor Naaman of Rutgers University and formerly at Yahoo! Research gave an excellent talk on using social inputs to improve the experience of multimedia search. The general theme was about discovering metadata for a given multimedia concept from web 2.0 sites, then using those to cluster potential results and choose representative ones.

In one application, this approach was used to identify “representative” photos of a certain landmark, say the Golden Gate bridge, see WorldExplorer for an illustration. So first, you’d find all flickr photos geotagged and/or fickr-tagged by the location and name of the bridge (or any given landmark). Next, image processing (SIFT)  is applied to those images to cluster them into subsets that are likely to be of the same section and/or perspective of the bridge. Finally, relations between the images in each cluster are formed based on the visual relation, and link analysis is employed to find a “canonical view”. The result is what we see on the right sidebar in World Explorer, and described in this WWW’08 paper.

[Update: Mor commented that the content-based analysis part is not yet deployed in World Explorer. Thanks Mor!]

tagmaps1

Another example applied this approach to concerts on YouTube, and the purpose was to find good clips of the concert itself, rather than videos discussing it etc. Metadata describing the event (say, an Iron Maiden concert) was collected from both YouTube and sites such as Upcoming.org, and Audio Fingerprinting was employed to detect overlapping video sections, as it’s quite likely the concert itself would have the most overlap. Note that in both cases, the image/audio processing is a heavy task, and applying it only to a small subset filtered by social tags makes the work involved more feasible.

I’ll talk about the keynote (by Prof. Ben Schneiderman) on another post, this one is already way too long… Here are soundbites from some other talks:

Emil Ismalon of Collarity referred to personalized search (e.g. Google’s) as a form of overfitting, not letting me learn anything new as it trains itself only on my own history. That, of course, as a motivation for community-based personalization. 

Ido Guy of IBM talked about research they did comparing social network extracted from public and private sources. The bottom line is that some forms of social relations are stronger, representing collaboration (working on projects together, co-authoring papers or patents), and others are weaker, being more around the socializing activities (friending/following on SN, commenting on blogs etc) . Of course, that would be relevant for Enterprise social graph, not necessarily personal life…

Daphne Raban of Haifa University summarized her (empirical) research into motivations of participants in Q&A sites. The main bottom lines were: 1) money was less important to people who participate very often, but it’s a catalyst, 2) Being awarded with gratitude and conversation is the main factor driving people to become more frequent participants, and 3) in quality comparison, paid results ranked highest, free community results (Yahoo! Answers) ranked close, and unpaid single experts ranked lowest.

IBM IR seminar talk on Socially Connected Search

I had the pleasure today of presenting Delver in a talk I gave at IBM Haifa Research Labs IR  seminar. My slides are over here.

The seminar’s focus this year was on social search, and there were quite a few other talks I found very interesting, I’ll blog about those later on too. One of the positive surprises for me was the amount of work carried out at IBM-HRL on social/web 2.0 tools such as SONAR. Impressive social product work for a non-consumer player; I plan to read more of their published work on that.