Tag Archives: Amazon

Feeling Lucky Is the Future of Search

If you visit the Google homepage on your desktop, you’ll see a rare, prehistoric specimen – one that most Google users don’t see the point of: the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button.

Google has already removed it from most of its interfaces, and even here it only serves as a teaser for various Google nitwit projects. And yet the way things are going, the “Feeling Lucky” ghost may just come back to life – and with a vengeance.

lucky

In the early years, the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button was Google’s way of boldly stating “Our results are so great, you can just skip the result lists and head straight to destination #1”. It was a nice, humorous touch, but one that never really caught on as users’ needs grew more complex and less obvious. In fact, it lost Google quite a lot of money, since skipping the result list also meant users saw fewer and fewer sponsored results – Google’s main income source. But usability testing showed that users really liked seeing the button, so Google kept it there for a while.

But there’s another interface rising up that prides itself on returning the first search result without showing you the list. Did you already guess what it is?

robots

Almost every demo of a new personal assistant product will include questions being answered by the bot tapping into a search engine. The demos will make sure to use simple single-answer cases, like “Who is the governor of California?” That’s extremely neat, and was regarded as science fiction not so many decades ago. Amazing work on query parsing and entity extraction from search results has led to great results on this type of query, and the quality of the query understanding, and resulting answers, is usually outstanding.

michelle

However, these are just some of the possible searches we want our bots to run. As we get more and more comfortable with this new interface, we will not want to limit ourselves to one type of query. If you want to be able to get an answer for “Give me a good recipe for sweet potato pie” or “Which Chinese restaurants are open in the area now?”, you need a lot more than a single answer. You need verbosity, you need to be able to refine – which stretches the limits of how we perceive conversational interfaces today.

Part of the problem is that it’s difficult for users to understand the limits of conversational interfaces, especially when bot creators pretend that there are no such limits. Another problem lies in the fact that a natural language interface may simply be a lousy choice for some interaction types, and imposing it on them will only frustrate users.

There is a whole new paradigm of user interaction waiting to be invented, to support non-trivial search and refine through conversation – for all of those many cases where a short exchange and single result will probably not do. We will need to find a way to flip between vocal and visual, manage a seamless thread between devices and screen-based apps, and make digital assistants keep context on a much higher level.

Until then, I guess we’ll continue hoping that we’re feeling lucky.

 

siri-physics

Amazon, Apple, and Application Platforms

Apple is known for keeping a bustling legal department. Steve Jobs reportedly swore to “destroy Android“, the results of which Samsung has felt very well.

But Apple has more enemies to fight. It holds a complicated relationship with Amazon, who now produces the second most selling tablet after the iPad, claiming it already owns 22% of the US tablet market. That’s a lot of iPads that Apple isn’t selling, and so it readies its own iPad Mini in response.

A less familiar front in this battle is Apple’s “False Advertising” suit against Amazon with regard to the latter’s use of “App Store” for its Android-based application market. Amazon’s response ridiculed this claim, but this does raise the question – what exactly is Amazon’s app store all about?

Amazon’s Kindle store is one strange beast. Kindle apps are in fact re-purposed Android apps, with some added functionality. However, Amazon took care to clearly differentiate the Kindle’s UX and app store from the general Android market. So what is the justification for developing an extra Kindle app?

Every application development platform has its unique core capabilities, which developers can leverage for their own application. Developers get to apply their creative ideas on these assets, while the platform owner enjoys increased engagement for their users, with apps taking these capabilities to places the platform did not even imagine. Facebook’s application platform revolved around the social graph, a unique and very valuable data asset, and Apple provided access to the iPhone’s unique (at the time) features such as its accelerometers and gyroscope, GPS and camera.

Visiting the Amazon Kindle SDK site shows where Amazon feels it has the advantage: 1-click purchasing. This patented Amazon feature (a patent which Apple has actually licensed) can appeal to application developers who feel their application has premium features worth paying for, if only the payment was frictionless. Initial results seemed to validate that, and show excellent revenue per user on Amazon’s platform.

And so, Amazon’s platform says a lot about where Amazon feels its strength lies with the Kindle. Unlike Apple, Amazon builds its success in the tablets market on selling content, much less than selling devices. Hence, expect Kindle to continue beating the iPad on price even when iPad mini launches.

Apparently, Amazon invented the WWW

Tim Berners Lee – behind you!

Amazon has been selling stuff online since as far back as 1973, at least if you believe this:

amazon1973

In fact, Google lists over 51,000 pages with this date on Amazon. And mind you – it is the exact date September 4 1973, not a day less, nor a day more.

Of course, some geeks may claim this has to do with some Amazon programmers’ default value, but the POSIX time for this date is just a boring 115945200, not some fun number like 1234567890. I prefer to attribute this to some evil Bezosish conspiracy theory, now I just need to figure out what it was.

Suggestions?