What is Facebook’s Endgame with Open Graph API?

On Thursday, Facebook outlined some of its platform roadmap plans for developers. One of the items on the long list was called the “Open Graph API“, and with such a name it was sure to raise some interest.

Details were scarce, but the general message coming out of Facebook is that the Open Graph API will allow any site to embed a Facebook page in it, allowing the site owner to set status messages, share links etc., without visiting Facebook itself, and more importantly without sending its visitors to Facebook.

That sounded like a feature aimed primarily at brands, or as Ethan Beard of Facebook presented it: “This will be good for brands like Coke.” Makes perfect sense, as these brands are already using Facebook as part of their social media efforts, but would prefer to have it done on their site rather than on Facebook itself.

Thinking deeper into where Facebook is heading, though, I would think there is a more major endgame to all this. We already know that Facebook wants us to consider it as our online identity. So it allows you to reuse that Facebook identity on other websites and sign in using Facebook Connect. That’s one side of the coin. And then the other side of it is, you have your own website or blog where you may publish thoughts, links and photos that you didn’t publish on Facebook. Facebook would clearly want to bridge that gap as well.

belongs-to-us

Half a year ago, Facebook adopted the emerging Activity Streams standard for publishing and consuming an individual’s lifestream events to lifestreaming frameworks, a standard promoted by open standards evangelist Chris Messina. So that fits in nicely into the puzzle now: wouldn’t it be nicer if you could publish all this non-Facebook activity into your Facebook’s page, which will now be embedded into your personal website, courtesy of the Open Graph API?

The API then is just the funnel through which your activity stream is published back into Facebook. You get to leverage the social graph you already defined and came to like on Facebook, and Facebook gets tighter integration with your life outside of Facebook, if you still had any. Smart move for Facebook.

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